The Lean UX Quiz




Take this 10 question quiz and find out how savvy your organization is in applying Lean strategies to your user experience work.




Question 1

Have project teams been trained in the basics of Lean strategies and concepts?


We don’t do much training in my organization. We are figuring it out as we go along.

We all read a book or two on Lean.

Some people have attended a Lean class.

Everyone on the project team has attended a Lean class.

Question 2

How do you create and test features and functionality of the product you are designing?


We design a feature or part of a product, deploy the design and do A/B testing. If there’s a user experience problem we then figure out what to do.

We try and do some user research before we design.

We follow a basic user-centered design process – we do user research, then prototype a design, and then test it.

We create design hypotheses, prototype enough of a design to test the hypotheses, test it and then decide what to do.

Question 3

How do you collaborate on design projects?


We try to be efficient by working on projects on our own as much as possible. We meet with others if/when we are missing critical information.

There are usually two people working on a project. It may be any combination of User Experience designer, programmer/developer, stakeholder, or subject matter expert.

We have specific touch points throughout the project and we collaborate with others for these specific touch points. For example, sometimes we may need to meet with the subject matter expert, sometimes with a stakeholder, sometimes with the developer.

We put together project teams that work together throughout the project. This team includes at least one of each: user experience person, developer, stakeholder, subject matter expert, and perhaps others as needed for that particular project.

Question 4

The main reason we want to do Lean UX is because:


We want to incorporate user experience, but we don't have much time and budget, so doing it "Lean" is the best way for us.

We are an Agile shop, so "Lean" is the best way for us.

We don't want to have to create specs and documentation. They are a waste of time and energy.

Lean concepts and processes result in better designs that are sustainable and will meet the needs of the business and our target audience.

Question 5

Who is behind the Lean UX "movement" in your organization?


I'm pretty much a lone wolf.

We have a small team who has started it.

There are pockets of "Leaners" throughout the organization.

There is a high level sponsor who is championing the Lean movement in our organization.

Question 6

Which of the following best describes your organization’s reaction to trying out processes and methodologies such as Lean, Agile, etc?


We do things a certain way and have for a long time. We don’t like to change.

We switch our processes all the time. It’s kind of a “Methodology of the Month” club.

We tend to research methods very thoroughly and then decide whether or not to adopt. If we adopt it’s a big overhaul.

We set up some experimental teams to try out new methodologies and if the experiments are successful then we put together a plan for wider adoption.

Question 7

What is your organization’s culture around getting feedback from customers/target audience/users?


We don’t like to bother our customers/target audience. Only special projects can get approval to talk to them.

We can get approval to talk to customers/target audience members only if it is an internal project, i.e., the target audience is employees.

We can get approval to talk to customers/target audience members, but we have to go through a central internal service and they have to run the study.

It’s pretty easy to get access/approval to talk to customers/target audience members.

Question 8

What is your organization’s culture around experimentation and failure?


Failure is frowned on. If you experiment and fail you will be seen as unreliable and a non-performer. It’s a career killer.

It’s kind of a “catch 22”. It’s OK to suggest new ideas, but you will have to prove that they are working before you get the OK to officially try them.

Experimemtation is encouraged, but failure is bad.

Teams are encouraged to be “intrepeneurs” and to experiment with new ideas and processes, even if a particular idea fails. People are not punished for trying new things.

Question 9

When does User Experience work happen at your organization?


If there is time the developers will make some small changes to fix things during or after implementation so that the user experience is better.

We have someone who does user testing when a project/product is completed.

We have a User Experience team that reviews all of our designs as we are designing/developing them.

Every team has a UX person who is involved in creating hypotheses, designs MVPs to test the hypotheses, conducts testing and feedback sessions to collect data, and is involved in pivot decisions.

Question 10

What is the perceived role of User Experience (UX) in your organization?


UX is about making things look aesthetically pleasing once they are developed.

UX is part of what the developers do – they design the interface and the interactions of the product.

UX is doing some user research, prototyping, and some user testing.

UX is the vehicle by which we create new products or add new features. Designing and testing user experience features and functionality is how we decide what products to implement.


If you scored from 0 to 17:
Your organization has a way to go before it will be Lean UX savvy. You have corporate culture issues to deal with, and some training that is needed. Here is a list of recommendations for you:
  • Look over the Lean UX Checklist at the bottom of this page and pick a place to start. We suggest you start with training so you have a clear idea of what Lean UX and Lean concepts are all about. For example, check out The Team W’s next Lean UX course.
  • Make sure you read The Lean Startup by Eric Ries, even if you aren’t a startup.
  • Other places to go for information are Susan Weinschenk’s blog posts on Why Lean UX Might Just Rock Your World and 5 Myths Of Lean UX

If you scored from 18 to 25:
You’ve got a start on what you need to do to encourage Lean in your organization. But you have lots of holes. Here is a list of recommendations for you:
  • Look over the Lean UX Checklist at the bottom of this page and put together a plan of how to deal with your missing pieces.
  • If you haven’t already, make sure you read The Lean Startup by Eric Ries, even if you aren’t a startup.
  • We also suggest you send some of your team to Lean training. For example, check out The Team W’s next Lean UX course.
  • Other places to go for information are Susan Weinschenk’s blog posts on Why Lean UX Might Just Rock Your World and 5 Myths Of Lean UX

If you scored from 26 to 33:
You’ve made good progress on being Lean savvy at your organization, but you are not all the way there yet. Here are some recommendations for you:
  • Look over the Lean UX Checklist below and see which areas you need to work on. Put together a plan of how to fully implement the missing pieces.
  • Make sure everyone on the team has read The Lean Startup by Eric Ries, even if you aren’t a startup.
  • Consider sending the whole team to Lean training. If you can’t send the whole team, then at least send the people who are new to Lean processes. For example, check out The Team W’s next Lean UX course.
  • Other places to go for information are Susan Weinschenk’s blog posts on Why Lean UX Might Just Rock Your World and 5 Myths Of Lean UX

If you scored from 34 to 40:
Your organization is Lean UX savvy. Keep up the good work. Use the Lean UX Checklist below to see what you might be missing, and decide how to fill any remaining gaps.

The Lean UX Checklist:

Everyone on project teams that are designing and/or developing new products and services has had Lean training.
Project teams understand and have adopted the main Lean UX concepts and processes including experiments, hypotheses, minimum viable products, testing, and pivot points.
Project teams work together throughout a project. Teams include at least one of each: user experience person, developer, stakeholder, subject matter expert, and perhaps others as needed for that particular project.
The organization wants to implement Lean concepts and processes because it knows that the result is better designs that are sustainable and meet the needs of both the business and the target audience.
There is a high level sponsor in the organization who is championing the Lean movement.
The organization has tested the Lean idea with some experimental teams and has a plan now for spreading Lean throughout the organization.
Teams can easily get access to customers/target audience during the design process.
The organization encourages teams to be “intrepeneurs” and to experiment with new ideas and processes, even if a particular idea fails. People are not punished for trying new things.
User Experience staff are involved in projects from beginning to end. They are designing and testing hypotheses, and getting feedback from customers/target audience throughout the project.
User Experience is viewed as the vehicle by which new products and services, or new features and functionality to existing products are created.


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